Triangulation

By relating compositional components to one another, I am able to expand context and achieve greater accuracy in my drawings and paintings. Through my studies, I observed my tendency to relate things in terms of their proximity. Upon considering why I do that, I believe it is simply for the sake of convenience. It's very easy to compare or contrast something in relation to whatever is immediately next to it. I've found, however, that In order to improve my understanding of something, it is advantageous to push the boundaries of comparison points as far out from the point of origin as I am able. Thus, pushing me out of a visual comfort zone. The further out I look for a relationship and point of comparison, the more I am able to accurately render it. This applies to shapes, colors, lines, angles, values, and even life.  

The visual technique that helps me to accomplish this is triangulation. With this approach, I look for a single, distinct point of reference as a source of truth (an anchor), by which I compare all other references. Once that point is established, I look for the next obvious point. From this secondary point, I look for a third point to relate to, in order to further perspective. Of course, I could expand to have additional points, but three seems to be the minimal number required to achieve the accuracy I seek. This is one of several tools I use to interpret the visual world through pattern recognition.

The examples above were studies for a self portrait.

The examples above show the progression of a work in progress, illustrating how triangulation ultimately translates into an actual drawing (self-portrait).

Loving Vincent

Last weekend, I saw the film Loving Vincent. The film is illustrated through painted animation that references Van Gogh's work not only in terms of style, but subject matter and characters as well. The technical aspects of the film are truly impressive - 100 artists, each frame hand-painted. This was truly a labor of love.

The idea of so many artists contributing to this film was such a moving (literally) tribute to a beautiful, and often misunderstood soul who was not long for this world, but left a wealth of timeless art and inspiration. I absolutely love these types of experiences that open my eyes to possibility! This was a great reminder for what I am trying to do with my work as well - using expressive brushstrokes and color to convey the feeling of seeing the world through fresh eyes again.

I highly recommend seeing this film. If you do, feel free to share your comments and let me know what you think!

 "Landscape at Twilight" Vincent VanGogh

"Landscape at Twilight"
Vincent VanGogh